Liechtenstein 1999

In 1999, the population of Liechtenstein was estimated at approximately 32,000 people. The economy of the country is based largely on finance, manufacturing and tourism. Its main industries are banking, electronics and precision instruments. Liechtenstein has a long history of strong foreign relations with other countries in Europe and beyond. In terms of politics, Liechtenstein has had a hereditary constitutional monarchy since 1806 with Hans-Adam II as Prince since 1989. The Landtag is responsible for legislative authority in Liechtenstein and is elected by universal suffrage every four years. See ethnicityology for Liechtenstein in the year of 2018.

Yearbook 1999

Liechtenstein 1999

Liechtenstein. In August, Liechtenstein celebrated his National Day in memory of the first land acquisition in 1699 by a Liechtenstein prince who laid the geographical foundation for the Principality. Visit Countryaah official website to get information about the capital city of Liechtenstein. The festivities took place on a large meadow adjacent to the princely castle of Vaduz. All citizens of the country as well as visiting tourists were invited to listen and enjoy refreshments. After a fair, Prince Hans spoke with Adam II and Parliament’s spokesman. Both speeches were characterized by the monarch’s ambition to change the distribution of power in the country and the role of the head of state. The prince has put forward a proposal, which is not known, but he stressed that if Parliament does not approve of his proposal he will demand a referendum on the matter. At the same time, the 54-year-old monarch told him that he intended to withdraw from politics and gradually surrender his duties to the 31-year-old heiress, Alois.

  • Also see Abbreviationfinder.org to see the acronym of LIE which stands for Liechtenstein and other definitions of this 3-letter abbreviation.

Map of Liechtenstein Vaduz in English

The President warned against the unwise in questioning the principle of the distribution of power as expressed in the Constitution of 1921. He feared that such a thing could jeopardize the stability of Liechtenstein to date.

About the author